Advertising and Travel Photographer Susan Seubert Shares Her Packing Tips for Travel

Advertising and Travel Photographer Susan Seubert Shares Her Packing Tips for Travel

Greetings!  I’m packing for my upcoming trip with National Geographic Expeditions to Iceland and I thought it might be useful to share some of the tips and tricks I’ve learned over the years about how to make traveling a little more comfortable.  I estimate that I spend about half the year on the road in hotels, airplanes, airports, ships, boats, surfboards, cars, trains and just walking around.  It can be exhilarating and exhausting, so I’ve learned a few things that make everything from camping to glamping a little more pleasant.

  • Stay Organized.  The best thing to do while traveling is to develop good organizational habits.  This makes everything from passing through airport security to checking into hotels, to dealing with lost luggage, a lot easier. I photograph my luggage both inside and out so that in the dreadful event that it’s lost, I have a photo to show the airline and/or insurance company.
  • Packing Cubes Are Your Friend! In March, I had to travel to the East Coast to give a TEDx talk, (you can’t wear black or red for the video), head directly from there to Ireland to photograph a 2 week story in the bitter cold, (picture horizontal rain and blowing snow while carrying a carbon fiber tripod and a heavy camera kit), then head straight to the Caribbean to teach photography on a luxury yacht, (think 90 degree heat and opulent accommodations).  Just trying to work out what shoes to take was a challenge, not to mention having to wear arctic gear for shooting outdoors as well as some nice dresses for dinner on board the SY Sea Cloud.  When I pack my clothes, I separate everything into cubes based on clothing categories: dresses, socks, pajamas, bottoms, etc… Then, using white tape and a sharpie, I label each cube with its contents.  When I’m staying in a different hotel every night, my suitcase is already organized as though it were a closet.  Even if I’m exhausted and in a dark and unfamiliar hotel room, I can always find my clean shirts and my toothbrush.
A few of my packing cubes that will go in the gear bag for padding.
  • Pick Smart Travel Clothing.  Sorry guys, this is a post for the lady travelers 🙂 I wear skirts when I travel.  For one thing, they are much more comfortable for long haul flights, or hiking, than pants. They are also slightly dressier than jeans or sweatpants. I choose the Royal Robbins Cargo Skirt because it is made of stretchy, water-wicking fabric, so if you spill something, it’s easy to clean.  In my skirt pockets I can fit a small wallet, passport, iPhone X, Kleenex, a small bottle of hand sanitizer and some aspirin.  This way, I don’t have to dig around in a bag at security when they ask for my ID, nor do I have to rifle through my purse to find a credit card to buy a sandwich on the plane. I also slip a Shout Wipe into my pocket in case I spill, or am spilled on.  On my last flight to Dublin, I dripped mustard on my skirt.  I used a Shout Wipe on it on the plane, then when I got to my hotel, I just rinsed the skirt in water in the sink.  Not only was it not stained, the skirt looked freshly laundered! I wrote about my favorite travel clothes in a previous blog here, so if you want to read on, there is more info!
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Royal Robbins Women’s Discovery skirt. Great for airline travel!
  • Your Medicine Is the Best Medicine.  There is nothing worse than getting sick when you’re traveling.  When you are staying in a place with limited resources, it pays to pack a few extra things for those “just-in-case” situations.  My favorite cough drops are Ricola Wild Berry and are difficult to find in the best of situations.  I pick up a Family Pack size every so often and pack a snack bag of them in my First Aid kit.  It is nice to have a small comfort like cough drops when you’re feeling miserable.  I also put Wet Ones and some lavender scented organic hand sanitizer into my kit.  In an attempt to avoid getting sick, I use the Wet Ones to wipe down my airplane tray table and I use the lavender hand sanitizer on my hotel pillow, which not only kills germs, the lavender scent is a natural sleep aid. A Benadryl stick comes in handy if you get bitten by just about anything.  It’s small enough to carry and doesn’t leak like a lot of other liquids. Deep Woods OFF! Wipes are not as messy as other insect repellants and are convenient if you really need to use this powerful chemical. A pocket size of Kleenex tissues is handy for just about anything, and don’t forget to floss!
  • Bar Soap. One of the latest trends in hotels is the bulk shampoo/shower gel/body lotion.  I really appreciate the fact that these decrease packaging waste.  The problem for me is that I cannot tolerate lemon scented cleaners and it seems that lemon verbena is the scent du jour.  I always carry a small bar of unscented soap in my toiletries kit when I’m gone for longer than an overnight trip.
  • Sunscreen. SkinCeuticals Physical Fusion UV Defense Sunscreen is my new go-to sunscreen for the face, neck, ears, etc… It is both broad spectrum and reef safe.  I like the sample size for my kit, and then get the 50ml for everyday use.
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Some of my travel essentials: Kleenex, Dental Floss, Ricola Cough Drops, Bacitracin Antibiotic Ointment in a travel size, Advil Cold &Sinus Medicine, a bar of soap, Benadryl Itch Relief Stick, Lysol Spray, EO Hand Sanitizer, Shout Wipes, Wet Ones and OFF! Deep Woods Wipes.

For those of you who are traveling to some of the cooler places on the planet, the next section is an update on my favorite travel gear.  This may come in handy if you are joining me in my forthcoming trips to Iceland, Antarctica or Alaska.

  • Women’s Patagonia Down Sweater This jacket is lightweight, warm, warm when wet, packable, and provides good color for pictures.  I have two – one with a hood and one without.  You can layer them easily for extra warmth, which is a necessity when in Antarctica.
Here are my Patagonia tops, ready for the suitcase. Lightweight and stuffable!
  • These Boots are Made for Expedition Travelknee high neoprene boots from the MUCK company keep your feet dry, even when you submerge them completely for long periods of time.  They have a fleece lining for extra warmth. However, if you are traveling with Lindblad/National Geographic, you may want to consider renting them.  I tried the rentals out and they are great, plus it means you don’t have to haul them around the world – they can take up the better part of a suitcase. My Ariat Fatbaby Cowboy Boots are also waterproof, have a grippy sole with a wide toe box and are actually cute with a skirt. Keen Hiking Boots  are top notch because although they aren’t as waterproof as the MUCK Boots, they hold up well under wet conditions and are fairly lightweight.  I’ve had mine for years and although they aren’t completely waterproof, they still stay fairly dry.
  • Red Ledge Rain Pants Rock! These lined, waterproof pants are the best. They are warm and unzip down both legs so as you warm up you can cool off as needed. I picked up a pair in Sitka because the ones I had bought for the trip were insufficient for the Alaska deluge. I’ve been using them ever since not only in Alaska but at both poles.
  • Buff Headgearfor Warmth and Style: These are indispensable as I have very sensitive ears.  I wear them all the time in both cold and warm weather as a way to tame my hair in the breeze but also a way to cover my ears without ungainly headwear.  They make them in a light merino wool as well as a cotton/poly blend for warmer climates.  I often wear them surfing or SUPing to protect the top of my head from getting sun.  They are also good to wear when snorkeling to help keep your hair out of your mask.
  • ACCESSORIZE!  I always carry a few carabiners for my water bottle and lens wipes. Drybags are better than ziplocks to keep your gear dry in the rain or while you’re transiting in a zodiac. I carry these 3 for a range of purposes. The ThinkTank Rapid Belt with a Hubba Hubba Hiney and Digital Holster are great for keeping all of your gear on hand but hands free. Each camera bag from ThinkTank also comes with a rain fly which is super handy.  I use the BlackRapid Hybrid Breathe when I’m using a 2 camera setup, and also have leashes for them.
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On assignment for National Geographic Traveler in Canada at Peyto Lake with the Think Tank Camera System and my Canon DSLR cameras.

CAMERA GEAR. What’s the best choice?  This is a question I am asked frequently, and there is no easy answer.  I still carry Canon DSLR cameras.  My brain and body are molded to the form and function of these cameras.  I love the sharp glass, responsiveness of the shutter and the control over everything using external buttons as opposed to having to dig through a menu to find a function.  Even the custom function buttons on some of the newer cameras, which are designed to put those at your fingertips, don’t seem to live up to their promise, for my purposes.  That said, my new favorite travel camera is the Sony RX10 III. (Note: They have since released the RX10 IV). This is a great, all-around travel camera that is fairly compact.  What blows me away is the fact that it has a 24-600mm optical zoom!!!  Seriously.  That’s very cool.  And it’s pretty fast.  The widest aperture is f2.4-4, but what disappoints me is that it switches to f4 maximum pretty quickly, so you can’t exploit the shallow focus once you’ve gone beyond about 35mm.  But for most travel photos, this camera has everything you need to shoot both cityscapes and wildlife.  It has a burst mode, is completely silent and can be controlled remotely with your smartphone.  It’s also very easy to send an image to your phone, thus not having the inconvenience of downloading an image and then transferring it to your iPhoto library.  It doesn’t allow for interchangeable lenses, but who needs anything else with the zoom range on this camera.  And it’s optical!  So for the money, this is my pick.  I found a blog post comparing the Canon 5DMK IV and the Sony RX10IV, and it covers all the things I would cover, so here it is.

2017 The Year in Pictures for Travel and Editorial Photographer Susan Seubert

2017 The Year in Pictures for Travel and Editorial Photographer Susan Seubert

My how time flies! 2017 was another whirlwind of travel and exploration: I visited both poles, watched dolphins in Mexico, went whale watching in Hawaii, marched with three million of my fellow Americans in Washington, visited castles in England, had my first true Guinness in Ireland, hiked along the coast in Wales and explored Vancouver, BC by boat. I took over 20,000 photos while on assignment this year which although is not a record, it’s certainly a lot of images!  Below are a few of my favorites, marking my global journey for this past year.  My hope is that by showing the beauty and diversity of this marvelous world, that you will be inspired to travel.

The view of Mt. Hood and downtown Portland, Oregon from Pittock Mansion in Forest Park

I started the year off on assignment for Vox Media, shooting a story about my hometown of Portland, Oregon. Here is the view of Mt. Hood from Pittock Mansion.

Puerto los Gatos, Baja, Mexico, Gulf of California

First stop on the 2017 World Tour: Baja! Always one of my favorite places on Earth, the Gulf of California is wild and beautiful. We enjoyed a sunset beach bbq at Puerto los Gatos.

Women's March on Washington, Washington, DC, USA

Second stop: Washington D.C. for the Women’s March. We will persist!

Humpback Whale watching from a large, inflatable raft in the 'Au 'au channel off of the coast of Lahaina on the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA

Third stop: The ‘Au ‘au channel off of the coast of Maui to witness the annual migration of Humpback Whales from Alaska. We’ll be heading back there this year!

Booth Island, Antarctica

Next up, Antarctica in February. This was the last trip of the Antarctic season, so we explored the southern ocean to see incredible landscapes and wildlife. Here is a Gentoo Penguin colony with gorgeous ice in the distance.

Gold Harbour, South Georgia

One of my favorite places on Earth: Gold Harbour, South Georgia. Here we were treated to a rainbow and King penguins on the beach.

Susan Seubert talking about her show, "Not A Day Goes By," at the Froelick Gallery in downtown Portland, Oregon, USA

I opened my show, “Not A Day Goes By,” at the Froelick Gallery in April. The work was also shown at this year’s Venice Biennale.

Banner of John Yeon's Shire, photograph by Susan Seubert, hanging on the exterior of the Portland Art Museum for the exhibition, "Quest for Beauty"

I have been photographing John Yeon’s, “The Shire,” in the Columbia River Gorge for the last 7 years and the book was finally published. The Portland Art Museum used one of the images to announce the show about Yeon.

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In May, my family and friends joined us in Venice for my opening at the Venice Biennale! Definitely a high point in my artistic career, the Biennale is the most prestigious venue for fine art on the planet. Picture here is me with my mom on the balcony of the Palazzo Bembo, home to the European Cultural Center that hosted the exhibition.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

After returning to the U.S. from Italy, it was back across the puddle for adventures starting in Arctic Svalbard where polar bears ruled the day!

Polar Bear, Spitsbergen, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

A once in a lifetime sighting: we watched a polar bear take a bearded seal, then proceed to have a feast. Even our Norwegian guides had never seen such a site! This is why traveling with National Geographic makes all the difference.

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

After spending time in Svalbard, we headed over to the famed fjords of Norway. We hiked and explored these beautiful waterways which was a joyous experience.

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Back in Oregon, science rules! We were some of the first in the United States to witness a total eclipse of the sun. I photographed it through a spotting scope.

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The diamond ring effect during the total eclipse of the sun. Taken in McMinnville, Oregon.

Maine Multimedia Workshop, Rockport, ME

The end of August took me back to school at the Maine Media Workshops where I learned about short form, multimedia storytelling from the master himself, Bob Sacha.

The Library at Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Europe

I had a brief moment at home before heading back to Europe, where Ireland awaited! I landed in Dublin and after visiting the stunning Library at Trinity College, we headed straight to a pub for a proper pint of Guinness!

Bodnant Gardens, Llandundo, Wales, Europe

From Ireland we sailed for Wales, where we visited the lush Bodnant Gardens in the rain.

Fowey, England, Europe

After exploring Wales for a few days, we headed to England, where the charming town of Fowey welcomed our rather large ship into port.

Grouse Mountain Skyride Surf Adventure is a summer opportunity to ride on top of the Grouse Mountain Gondola viewing platform as you ascend 1610 meters to the top of Grouse Mountain.  On a clear day, you can see for miles and your view will include all of

After my adventures on board the National Geographic Orion, I flew back to North America where I had an assignment to photograph lovely Vancouver, British Columbia. We had stunning weather! This is the Grouse Mountain Skyride Surf Adventure, with views back to the city from the top of the aerial tram.

Bordeaux, France, Europe

As soon as I wrapped the shoot in B.C., it was back across the Atlantic to meet my husband in beautiful Bordeaux. Here is Le Miroir d’eau at Place de la Bourse in Bordeaux during the blue hour.

Venice, Italy, Europe

After eating and drinking our way through France, we hopped an EasyJet flight to Venice, to take in the sights, and my show, one last time. Here is the Basilica San Marco in the morning, Venice, Italy.

Washington, DC, America, USA

We flew back to the U.S., and no sooner had we touched down, then I had some meetings to attend in our nation’s capital, so I flew to DC for a quick trip.

Kaanapali Beach Hotel, Lahaina, HI, USA

Then, it was back to Hawaii for us. I was fortunate enough to be invited to photograph the Keiki Hula Festival at the Ka’anapali Beach Hotel. It was inspiring to see these young people carrying on the Hawaiian tradition of hula.

Lahaina, HI, USA

My husband got to catch a few waves before I had to wave goodbye and head off to…

Charles Hotel, Boston, MA

Cambridge!! I had a fantastic shoot for the Charles Hotel. We spent a week making a library of images for the hotel’s new web site. I’ll post more about this shoot once the job is live!

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Luckily for me, there was still time after Boston to head back to Hawaii, where I was able to enjoy some beach time with my husband. Cheers to an incredible 2017!

 

Travel Photographer Susan Seubert in Arctic Svalbard and the Fjords of Norway

Travel Photographer Susan Seubert in Arctic Svalbard and the Fjords of Norway

Velkommen! I recently returned from an epic adventure to the Svalbard Archipelago and the beautiful Fjords of Norway with National Geographic Expeditions.  This trip was phenomenal because we not only explored the land of the midnight sun where we hiked on the arctic tundra and took a late night stroll on the fast ice, we also witnessed a polar bear take a bearded seal.  Polar bears are difficult to see under any circumstances but to actually witness a successful hunt is truly a rare event.  After heading south past Bear Island, we arrived at the northern end of mainland Norway with our first stop in sunny Tromsø.  From there, we took the ship into many of the infamous fjords with towering, snow-capped mountains, beguiling forests and quaint fishing villages, whose residents welcomed us with open arms and loads of Norwegian waffles!

Below is a collection of images that tell the story of our journey by ship as we explored this beautiful area of the world. Enjoy!

Svalbard, Norway, Europe

The entrance to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Longyearbyen, Norway.

Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Signs warning of the presence of polar bears on the edge of the town of Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway.

Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Our first evening in the land of the midnight sun and the ocean conditions couldn’t be any better! Gorgeous sunshine and glassy water welcomed us to our adventure in Svalbard.

Svalbard, Norway, Europe

A late night champagne toast on the bow to welcome everyone on board the National Geographic Orion. The sun never sets here at this time of year. Don’t forget your sunscreen!

Daudmannsoya, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Our first steps on to the arctic tundra were at Daudmannsoya where we saw our first reindeer and some interesting earth formations.

Daudmannsoya, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Our first arctic fox at Daudmannsoya. You can see this fox is losing its white winter coat.

Walrus haul out at Poolepynten, Prins Karls Forland, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Our next stop was to observe a group of walrus hauled out at Poolepynten, Svalbard.

Walrus haul out at Poolepynten, Prins Karls Forland, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

These giant blubbery animals come out of the ocean to rest and weigh in on average at about 2,000 lbs.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

The next day we headed to Hornsund to investigate the fast ice and look for polar bears.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Another sunscreen-worthy day in Hornsund!

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Our ice class ship had no problem negotiating the ice floes. Here we saw some fresh polar bear tracks on the ice, seen right at the tip of the shadow of our bow.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

The ice cracked as we began to park the ship in the fast ice.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Scanning the horizon as this is prime habitat for the giant fuzzy bears.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Our first polar bear of the trip! We spotted this one that was very far off in the distance, in front of a glacier. He quickly disappeared behind the hill.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Because of the fantastic weather, we were treated to a bbq on the aft sun deck of the National Geographic Orion.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Later on, we were able to find ice that was thick enough for us to get out and explore. Of course, we sent the polar guards first to examine the fresh bear tracks.

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

After the all clear from our guards, everyone came out on the ice for a fun group picture!

Hornsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

After dinner, I joined one of our Norwegian spotters out on the observation deck to keep an eye out for bears. Difficult to believe that this is in the late evening!

Camp Miller, Bellsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

The emblematic reindeer grazing on the tundra at Camp Miller, Bellsund, Svalbard.

Camp Miller, Bellsund, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

These reindeer are smaller because they have to survive during the dark winter months. During summer, they shed and grow new antlers.

Polar Bear, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

We had headed back to Hornsund to spot bears. We found this one swimming in open water at about 5am. We watched it as it headed towards the ice where some seals were hauled out. It caught one and proceeded to have a great meal. A very special experience!

Polar Bear, Spitsbergen, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

The polar bear as it is eating its lunch and an ivory gull tries its best to get some of the meat.

Polar Bear, Spitsbergen, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Polar Bear, Spitsbergen, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Polar Bear, Spitsbergen, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

We pulled away after watching this bear catch and eat a bearded seal. Amazing!

Bear Island, Bjornoya, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

Bjørnøya, Bear Island, lies half way between Svalbard and mainland Norway. Its sea cliffs are home to large bird colonies.

Bear Island, Bjornoya, Svalbard, Norway, Europe

As we approached Bjørnøya, a large group of Fulmars joined the ship. They were so close that you could almost reach out and touch them!

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

This marks the beginning of our adventure into Norway’s beautiful fjords. We started in Hellmobotn, which is at the end of Tysfjorden, and home to a picturesque village.

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

We offered a range of hikes, one of which took us to the base of this tremendous waterfall.

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

Under the beautiful sun, we hiked in our first forest of the trip.

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

Cod hanging to dry in the village of Hellmobotn.

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

The glaciated walls of the fjord are very visible in Hellmobotn.

Hellmobotn, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

Picturesque buildings can be found throughout the fjord systems in Norway. This was taking as we were transiting out of Tysfjorden.

Lonkanfjorden, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

We awoke the next day at Lonkanfjorden, where one could hike, kayak or take a cruise in a zodiac.

Lonkanfjorden, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

The kayaks being prepared for the morning adventure!

Lonkanfjorden, Tysfjorden, Norway, Europe

Hiking deep in to the fjord at Lonkanfjorden.

Skrova, Norway, Europe

The quaint fishing village of Skrova in the Nordland county of Norway.

Skrova, Norway, Europe

Skrova is popular as a place where Norwegians have family summer homes that line the beautiful bay.

Skrova, Norway, Europe

Skrova is also an active fishing village, where cod is air dried using traditional methods. These were harvested shortly after we photographed them.

Trollfjord, Norway, Europe

We continued to be blessed with beautiful weather as we made our way into Trollfjord.

Trollfjord, Norway, Europe

Guests line up to watch as we enter this narrow fjord where the ship eventually noses in to the steep wall, in order to have our youngest guest pick a leaf from a tree.

Trollfjord, Norway, Europe

Getting close to the narrowest part of Trollfjord, at only 100 meters wide and 72 meters deep.

Vega, Norway, Europe

Our morning start in the fishing village of Vega, Norway. In 2004, Vega’s cultural landscape was inscribed by UNESCO on the World Heritage Site list as representative of “the way generations of fishermen/farmers have, over the past 1,500 years, maintained a sustainable living in an inhospitable seascape near the Arctic Circle, based on the now unique practice of eider down harvesting.”

Vega, Norway, Europe

Throughout our visits in the fjords, seeing houses with green roofs was not uncommon. According to our guide, this is done for purposes of insulation.

Vega, Norway, Europe

We were lucky to come across a man with 4 Lundehund, otherwise known as Norwegian Puffin Dogs. These animals were once used to hunt puffin birds for humans. As a result, they have 6 toes and can splay out flat. Although these were almost extinct at one point, they now number about 1500 worldwide.

Vega, Norway, Europe

One of the highlights of our visit to this island village was being treated to a local seafood tasting, which included sea urchins collected in the bay.

Vega, Norway, Europe

Although not a traditional Norwegian dish, this village is practicing sustainable seafood by looking to the Japanese for inspiration.

Smole, Norway, Europe

We were welcomed to this tiny fishing village on the island of Smøla by the owner of this house, Peggy.

Smole, Norway, Europe

Peggy’s home was at one point the family home of her husband’s, and now serves as their family’s summer home.

Smole, Norway, Europe

This village was built before the industrial revolution and although not on the lee side of the island, it allowed the fishermen to see the weather before deciding whether to head out to work in the morning.

Smole, Norway, Europe

This is Peggy, one of the warmest people I have ever encountered.

Smole, Norway, Europe

We were able to explore this tiny island on foot where photo opportunities were everywhere!

Smole, Norway, Europe

Our group hiking towards the House of Prayer where we were treated to a very nice history lesson from one of the villagers.

Smole, Norway, Europe

We were welcomed with a seemingly endless supply of fresh Norwegian waffles and home made strawberry jam. Delicious!

Smole, Norway, Europe

Peggy, along with her friends, acted as our hosts.

Briksdal Glacier, Norway, Europe

Today we got an early start as we had to catch the bus to the base of the Birksdal Glacier. It was a beautiful hike through the mist on a well paved road to get to the base of the glacier.

Briksdal Glacier, Norway, Europe

Briksdalsbreen is an arm of the great Jostedalsbreen Glacier, and located inside the Jostedalsbreen National Park.

Nordfjord, Norway, Europe

In Leon, we were lucky enough to be one of the first groups of visitors to ascend the Sky Lift which offers amazing views through the mist of the villages below.

Nordfjord, Norway, Europe

The heart-stopping vertical Leon Sky lift is not for the faint of heart.

Nordfjord, Norway, Europe

The National Geographic Orion parked at Leon, at the base of the Sky Lift in Nordfjord.

Bergen, Norway, Europe

The last stop on our journey, the quaint town of Bergen, Norway.

Bergen, Norway, Europe

After our morning guided tours, we explored the town on foot, including the famous fish market.

Bergen, Norway, Europe

Strolling past the beautiful Hanseatic buildings of Bryggen, a World Heritage Site, was a fine way to end this incredible trip.