Commercial Photographer Susan Seubert Photographs the Oregon Solar Eclipse

Commercial Photographer Susan Seubert Photographs the Oregon Solar Eclipse

Greetings fellow Earthlings!  The eclipse on August 21, 2017 was the first eclipse to pass over the entire continental United States in more than a century, and millions of people donned their safety glasses to witness the event.  Because I live in Oregon, the path of totality was less than 50 miles from my home, so off I went, iPhone in hand.  “Leave taking pictures of it to the professionals,” my wise father advised, which I did, except that I didn’t.  I have a small GoSky spotting scope with an attachment for my iPhone so with a little planning, I made a very easy setup that included a tripod and some solar mylar, courtesy of the Oregon Tourism Board’s glasses that they had distributed for the event.  After all, our great state was the first to get a glimpse of this celestial event, so why not make sure everyone can watch?  Thank you, Travel Oregon! Unbelievably enough, the weather was perfect for viewing in the Willamette Valley.  It was a spectacular sight to see the moon block out the sun for a total of 1 minute.  I, along with the small crowd that had gathered at Linfield College, was stunned at the beauty of it.

Below are a few photographs of my simple but effective setup, along with some images of the event.  I hope you enjoy the photos as the next one that we’ll have a chance to see here in Oregon won’t happen until October 5, 2108. For more photos, follow me on Instagram! Thanks for visiting.

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The GoSky spotting scope, iPhone, iPhone attachment plus mylar glasses to use as a filter over the camera lens, set up on a tripod.

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I had to make up a dark cloth so I could see the screen in order to get the camera and scope in the proper position.

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The action begins!

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Totality!!!!

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This phase is known as the “Diamond Ring” effect, as the glare from the surface of the moon looks like its namesake.

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Travel Photographer Susan Seubert shoots Road Trip to Round Up for Travel Oregon’s Instagram

Travel Photographer Susan Seubert shoots Road Trip to Round Up for Travel Oregon’s Instagram

Let ‘er buck!  That’s the phrase that rings throughout the small town of Pendleton, Oregon during the second full week of September where over 50,000 people descend to watch or participate in the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo.  This rodeo is unique in that since its inception in 1910 it has included a large Native American presence.  Over 300 tee pees are set up on the rodeo grounds where members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla gather to visit with one another and participate in displays of their culture.  One of my favorite events was the Indian Relay race where members of several tribes compete in a bareback horse race around the track.  It’s mind blowing to think that these athletes are able to ride at tremendous speed without the need for saddles, spurs or any of the other trappings of horse racing to which I am accustomed.  On the Saturday morning of the big rodeo weekend, the tribes invite the public to come down to the grass field of the stadium and watch as the tribal dance competitions take place.  There is drumming, singing and dancing where contestants are divided up by age and gender, then judged on their dancing skills.  Below are some of my favorite images from the 4 days that I covered just last weekend.  Enjoy and let ‘er buck!

Stock pens at the Pendleton Round Up, Pendleton, Oregon, USA

Stock pens at the Pendleton Round Up, Pendleton, Oregon, USA

Louis Sweowat of the Yakima Tribe showing me a headdress at the Pendleton Round Up, Pendleton, Oregon, USA

Louis Sweowat of the Yakima Tribe showing me a headdress at the Pendleton Round Up, Pendleton, Oregon, USA

The Grand Entry at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

The Grand Entry at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

One of the classic rodeo events, the Saddle Bronc competition at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

One of the classic rodeo events, the Saddle Bronc competition at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

Over 300 tee pees are set up on the grounds at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

Over 300 tee pees are set up on the grounds at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

one of the 700 cowboys who come to compete at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

one of the 700 cowboys who come to compete at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

Riders in the "Indian Relay Race" at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

Riders in the “Indian Relay Race” at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

The Native American or "Indian" Beauty Pageant at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

The Native American or “Indian” Beauty Pageant at the Pendleton Round Up Rodeo, Pendleton OR, USA

Travel photographer Susan Seubert shoots Pendleton Oregon Makers Story for Travel Oregon

 

Let Er Buck statue outside the Pendleton Round Up Grounds, Pendleton, Oregon

Let Er Buck statue outside the Pendleton Round Up Grounds, Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton has long been known for the Round Up, a rodeo that has been drawing thousands since its inception in 1910.  The city as a travel destination unto itself is a relatively new phenomenon.  Situated about 3 hours east of Portland in the high desert, Pendleton is a classic Western town.  One of the biggest draws is to visit the Pendleton Woolen Mills.  Now, you can sample craft beer, order custom cowboy boots, shop the antique stores, have a great steak dinner in a beautiful, Western themed restaurant and visit a contemporary art space. I recently had the chance to spend some time there photographing a story about some of the city’s craftsmen.  Below are a few of my favorite pictures from the shoot.  Check out the story online at TravelOregon.com.

23 Plus, a custom leather work shop in downtown Pendleton, Oregon owned by leather worker Joe Meling

23 Plus, a custom leather work shop in downtown Pendleton, Oregon owned by leather worker Joe Meling

23 Plus, a custom leather work shop in downtown Pendleton, Oregon owned by leather worker Joe Meling

23 Plus, a custom leather work shop in downtown Pendleton, Oregon owned by leather worker Joe Meling

Hamleys, a leather goods and Western wear shop, Cafe and Restaurant in downtown Pendleton, Oregon

The famous neon sign at Hamleys, a leather goods and Western wear shop, Cafe and Restaurant in downtown Pendleton, Oregon

Hamleys, a leather goods and Western wear shop, Cafe and Restaurant in downtown Pendleton, Oregon

Cowboys from Idaho shopping for saddles and hats at Hamleys, a leather goods and Western wear shop, Cafe and Restaurant in downtown Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton Woolen Mills in Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton Woolen Mills in Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton Woolen Mills in Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton Woolen Mills in Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton Woolen Mills in Pendleton, Oregon

Pendleton Woolen Mills in Pendleton, Oregon

Crow's Shadow in Pendleton, Oregon

Crow’s Shadow in Pendleton, Oregon

Master Printer Frank Jenzen showing the work of Rick Bartow, a Native American artist whose work is available for sale at Crow's Shadow, Pendleton, Oregon

Master Printer Frank Jenzen showing the work of Rick Bartow, a Native American artist whose work is available for sale at Crow’s Shadow, Pendleton, Oregon

Artist in Residence Samatha Wall working on her artwork with master printer Frank Janzen at Crow's Shadow in Pendleton, Oregon

Artist in Residence Samatha Wall working on her artwork with master printer Frank Janzen at Crow’s Shadow in Pendleton, Oregon

Stapleman Boot Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Stapleman Boot Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Stapleman Boot Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Stapleman Boot Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Montana Peaks Hat Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Montana Peaks Hat Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Montana Peaks Hat Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Montana Peaks Hat Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Montana Peaks Hat Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Montana Peaks Hat Company in Pendleton, Oregon

Travel Photographer Susan Seubert shoots Portland, Oregon for Smithsonian’s Instagram

This week I was given the keys to Smithsonian Magazine’s Instagram account.  My home base is Portland, Oregon and I love this city because not only is it beautiful, the community here is full of interesting and engaging people.  This week gave me an opportunity to share with the world some of the iconic people and places that I hold near and dear to my heart here in the Pacific Northwest.  Below are a few of the images from the project.  Please continue to follow me on my Instagram account @susanseubert

Have a beautiful summer!

On Assignment with National Geographic Photographer Susan Seubert

Greetings! I’ve written a few posts for National Geographic’s On Assignment blog covering my story that is in the November 2015 issue of National Geographic Traveler Magazine about a train trip on the Rock Mountaineer. You can read them here:

The Rocky Mountaineer passenger train as seen at dawn near Exshaw, Alberta, Canada, with Heart Mountain reflected in the Bow River

The Rocky Mountaineer passenger train as seen at dawn near Exshaw, Alberta, Canada, with Heart Mountain reflected in the Bow River

I’ll be writing about this assignment and more in the coming weeks, so please be sure to follow me here and on Instagram (@susanseubert).

Thank you and happy trails!

Susan Seubert Photography at Tanque Verde Ranch

I’m just back from two days in the saddle and on the ground photographing at the Tanque Verde Ranch in Tucson, Arizona with J Public Relations firm.

Tanque Verde is a beautiful cattle and guest ranch just outside the city of Tucson, situated on 60,000 acres of gorgeous desert landscape.  The property also is located adjacent to Saguaro National Park, home to its namesake cactus.

The property boasts all the amenities of a luxury hotel, however the authentic American West experience is what really drew me in. I’ve loved horses since I was a child and take every opportunity to pack my riding boots for a shoot.  The desert landscape is expressed beautifully at Tanque Verde.

The ranch offers walks with a naturalist guide who can identify the myriad native plants and animals that you’ll see either on foot or on horseback.

Certain nights they offer an outdoor bbq, complete with fire pits and margaritas – their signature prickly pear margarita is not to be missed!  You can get those at the Dog House saloon which is open daily.  If you want to take your holiday relaxation to the next level, check out their spa offerings.

I could have easily spent a week photographing at Tanque Verde, and I look forward to my next visit!

Giddyup!

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

Horses at Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tucson, AZ

A road runner, one of the birds native to the area.

A road runner, one of the birds native to the area.

 

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Joe Valdez, legendary cowboy, at the stables at Tanque Verde Ranch

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

The prickly pear margarita, the signature drink at Tanque Verde Ranch

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

The Tanque Verde Ranch Spa, for more relaxation

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

A young cowboy demonstrating roping

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tucson, AZ

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

An evening ride through the property of Tanque Verde Ranch

The Tanque Verde Ranch, a dude ranch located on the outskirts of the Saguaro National Park in Tuscon, AZ

The outdoor bbq complete with fire pits and live music

Susan Seubert Photography’s Image Chosen as One of the Best in 2014 by Dutch National Geographic Traveler

 

Two girls skipping stones at the edge of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park, Montana

Two girls skipping stones at the edge of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park, Montana, using a Canon 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM lens on a 5D Mark III

A photograph from a story I shot about Idaho, Wyoming and Montana for the Dutch edition of National Geographic Traveler was recently named one of the top 6 images published by the magazine in 2014.  When I think of the thousands of images each photographer shoots and submits for each story, I feel humbled to have an image so honored.  I can only marvel at the editorial work needed to winnow so many images into just 6 for an entire year.

The image that was chosen is a picture of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park, (shown above).  There are two Amish girls skipping stones on the lake. I remember this moment vividly. The editor and I had stopped for a break. I noticed a group of women and girls reading the interpretive signs next to the lake.  These women were so striking in their dresses and head coverings that I couldn’t resist making some images of them. The color of their clothing seemed to come out of the landscape itself, which had a very blue cast that afternoon.  I thought my timing was off as they were just leaving when I started to approach them, but luckily I had started to take pictures of the unfolding scene while on my way over to where they had gathered to admire the lake.  I had my regular, two camera set-up at the time: one 5D Mark III with a 70-200mm and a second 5D Mark III with a 24-105mm.  First, I began using a 200mm to photograph the women from the back, which made a very pretty picture.  However, I had gotten close enough to use a shorter lens when I noticed the girls skipping stones. Although I was only able to take a few frames before they darted off, I managed to get the shot. This experience was a nice reminder that it only takes one frame to capture a beautiful moment.

Two Amish women admiring the view of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park, Montana

Two Amish women admiring the view of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park, Montana, photographed using Canon’s 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM on a 5D Mark III